General

General

  • LAVIOR's participation at the APMA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. LAVIOR's participation at the APMA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.

    Posted on by Anabelle Savion

     

    We are pleased to announce our participation at the APMA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.
    We will present new technologies to treat wounds.

    Come and visit us at booth 210 #ASMDC #podiatry #woundcare #APMA

    Link to event: https://www.apma.org/Events/TheNational.cfm?navItemNumber=27523

     

     

     

     

    We are pleased to announce our participation at the APMA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.
    We will present new technologies to treat wounds.

    Come and visit us at booth 210 #ASMDC #podiatry #woundcare #APMA

    Link to event: https://www.apma.org/Events/TheNational.cfm?navItemNumber=27523

     

     

     

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  • Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes by Dr. Mariela Glandt Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes by Dr. Mariela Glandt

    Posted on by Anabelle Savion

    Insulin resistance and prediabetes occur when the body becomes insensitive to insulin.

    What is insulin?

    Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that helps glucose in your blood enter cells in your muscle, fat, and liver, where it’s used for energy. Glucose comes from the food you eat or it’s made by the liver when we are fasting. When glucose levels rise after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin into the blood, allowing the sugar to enter the cells and allowing the  blood glucose levels to go back down to normal.

     

    What is insulin resistance?

    Insulin resistance is when cells in your muscles, fat, and liver don’t respond well to insulin and can’t easily take up glucose from your blood.   It is highly correlated with abdominal fat  (visceral fat).  There are people that can handle a great deal of fat and don’t get sick, while there are others have less fat cells and therefore can contain limited amounts of fat.  When  the fat cells are overstuffed with fat, the fat starts sending a clear message that it does not have room for any more sugar.  This is called insulin resistance, and what it is essentially suggesting is that the body does not want any more sugar to come in.  However, the pancreas must clear the high sugar from the blood and hence it makes more insulin to help glucose enter your cells. As long as your pancreas can make enough insulin to overcome your cells’ weak response to insulin, your blood glucose levels will stay in the healthy range. 

     

    Are there any problems with having insulin resistance, as long as glucose levels are in the normal range?

    Having normal sugar levels can be deceiving, giving a sense that there is no problem.  However high insulin levels, even with normal sugars, can be a problem.  In the short run, high insulin levels make us hungry and make us gain weight. High insulin levels are also associated with hypertension and with dyslipidemia.  In the long run, we know that high insulin levels are associated with higher rates of coronary artery disease, stroke, and cancer.

    What is prediabetes?

    When the pancreas is not able to keep up with the extra demand placed on it, then prediabetes sets in.  This means your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.  One in every 3 adults has pre-diabetes. People with prediabetes have up to a 50 percent chance of developing diabetes over the next 5 to 10 years. Fortunately type 2 diabetes can be prevented.

     What are the symptoms of insulin resistance and prediabetes?

    Insulin resistance and prediabetes usually have no symptoms.  Unfortunately, doctors do not routinely check for insulin levels and diagnosed insulin resistance through other proxies.  The presence of hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high uric acid, and fatty liver are all signs of insulin resistance.  A HbA1c above 5.7 already points to insulin resistance. A HbA1c of 6.5 already defines diabetes.

    How can we reverse insulin resistance?

    Insulin resistance can be reversed by starting to decrease the levels of insulin in the blood.  As insulin levels drop, then the body starts to respond better to insulin.  The best and fastest way to drop insulin levels is by decreasing the ingestion of food that raises insulin levels. The foods that most raise insulin are carbohydrates such as sugars, but also less obvious sugars such as pasta, rice, bread, pizza, potatoes, sweet potatoes, fruits, corn, and legumes.

    Besides food, other things will help improve insulin resistance.  This includes sleeping better, exercising, and decreasing emotional stress. 

    Other things that may contribute to insulin resistance include certain medicines, such as glucocorticoids, some antipsychotics, and some medicines for HIV.

    Dr. Mariela Glandt is an an endocrinologist specialized in Diabetes. She has recently opened the Glandt Center for Diabetes Care, a state of the art clinic in Tel Aviv.

     

     

     

     

    Insulin resistance and prediabetes occur when the body becomes insensitive to insulin.

    What is insulin?

    Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that helps glucose in your blood enter cells in your muscle, fat, and liver, where it’s used for energy. Glucose comes from the food you eat or it’s made by the liver when we are fasting. When glucose levels rise after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin into the blood, allowing the sugar to enter the cells and allowing the  blood glucose levels to go back down to normal.

     

    What is insulin resistance?

    Insulin resistance is when cells in your muscles, fat, and liver don’t respond well to insulin and can’t easily take up glucose from your blood.   It is highly correlated with abdominal fat  (visceral fat).  There are people that can handle a great deal of fat and don’t get sick, while there are others have less fat cells and therefore can contain limited amounts of fat.  When  the fat cells are overstuffed with fat, the fat starts sending a clear message that it does not have room for any more sugar.  This is called insulin resistance, and what it is essentially suggesting is that the body does not want any more sugar to come in.  However, the pancreas must clear the high sugar from the blood and hence it makes more insulin to help glucose enter your cells. As long as your pancreas can make enough insulin to overcome your cells’ weak response to insulin, your blood glucose levels will stay in the healthy range. 

     

    Are there any problems with having insulin resistance, as long as glucose levels are in the normal range?

    Having normal sugar levels can be deceiving, giving a sense that there is no problem.  However high insulin levels, even with normal sugars, can be a problem.  In the short run, high insulin levels make us hungry and make us gain weight. High insulin levels are also associated with hypertension and with dyslipidemia.  In the long run, we know that high insulin levels are associated with higher rates of coronary artery disease, stroke, and cancer.

    What is prediabetes?

    When the pancreas is not able to keep up with the extra demand placed on it, then prediabetes sets in.  This means your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.  One in every 3 adults has pre-diabetes. People with prediabetes have up to a 50 percent chance of developing diabetes over the next 5 to 10 years. Fortunately type 2 diabetes can be prevented.

     What are the symptoms of insulin resistance and prediabetes?

    Insulin resistance and prediabetes usually have no symptoms.  Unfortunately, doctors do not routinely check for insulin levels and diagnosed insulin resistance through other proxies.  The presence of hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high uric acid, and fatty liver are all signs of insulin resistance.  A HbA1c above 5.7 already points to insulin resistance. A HbA1c of 6.5 already defines diabetes.

    How can we reverse insulin resistance?

    Insulin resistance can be reversed by starting to decrease the levels of insulin in the blood.  As insulin levels drop, then the body starts to respond better to insulin.  The best and fastest way to drop insulin levels is by decreasing the ingestion of food that raises insulin levels. The foods that most raise insulin are carbohydrates such as sugars, but also less obvious sugars such as pasta, rice, bread, pizza, potatoes, sweet potatoes, fruits, corn, and legumes.

    Besides food, other things will help improve insulin resistance.  This includes sleeping better, exercising, and decreasing emotional stress. 

    Other things that may contribute to insulin resistance include certain medicines, such as glucocorticoids, some antipsychotics, and some medicines for HIV.

    Dr. Mariela Glandt is an an endocrinologist specialized in Diabetes. She has recently opened the Glandt Center for Diabetes Care, a state of the art clinic in Tel Aviv.

     

     

     

     

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  • Diabetes & Skin Conditions Diabetes & Skin Conditions

    Posted on by Anabelle Savion

     

     

    Diabetes is a progressive and chronic condition that affects every part of the body, and skin is no exception. In diabetes, skin conditions occur due to metabolic disturbances that cause changes in microcirculation, skin innervation, and immune responses. Some of the skin conditions in diabetes are unspecific, like a fungal infection, while others are more characteristic of the condition, like diabetic dermopathy or eruptive xanthomatosis.

    General skin conditions

    Bacterial infections – Bacterial infections are common in diabetes, since those with the disease have damaged skin innervation, damaged immunity, and live with chronic inflammation, thus such a person more prone to skin infections. Even a minute cut may turn into a chronic non-healing ulcer. Those with diabetes may develop boils, folliculitis, carbuncles, and infections of nails. Staphylococcal infection is the most common reason behind such eruptions.

    Fungal infections - People with diabetes may develop itchy skin due to a yeast-like fungus called Candida albicans. This fungal disease most commonly occurs in the moist parts of skin areas like under the breasts, in the mouth, between the fingers, and in armpits and groins. Athlete's foot is also common among those living with diabetes.

    Diabetes-specific skin conditions

    Diabetic dermopathy- a common condition in prolonged diabetes occurs due to damage caused to small blood vessels of the skin. A person living with diabetes may develop brown scaly patches in the front of the legs. These patches are painless and in fact completely symptomless, thus they rarely require any specific treatment. Instead, better control of diabetes helps in controlling them.

    Acanthosis Nigricans - This is a condition characterized by the development of dark-colored patches that are slightly raised. These patches usually occur on the hands, knees, and elbows. They are more common among the overweight individuals, and often weight reduction is the best treatment.

    Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD) - This condition looks similar to diabetic dermopathy, but is more severe and is characterized by fewer, but more profound and larger spots. NLD is caused due to vascular changes in diabetes. Unlike diabetic dermopathy, NLD patches may become scaly, and in rare cases, they may even crack. They do not require treatment unless they break or get infected.

    Diabetic blisters (Bullosis diabeticorum)- These are a formation of burn like blisters, that are painless and would heal in about 2-3 weeks. These blisters occur primarily due to neuropathy. Fortunately, such blisters will not leave a scar, and the only care that is required is to keep the skin clean so that they do not get infected at any stage. Bringing blood sugar level under control is the primary treatment of it.

    Eruptive xanthomatosis - They are mostly an indicator of poorly controlled diabetes and thus are more common in those with type 1 diabetes with severe dyslipidemia (high blood cholesterol and triglycerides). It’s a condition characterized by the formation of yellow, pea-like enlargements at the back of hands, feet, buttocks. Only effective treatment of this condition is diabetes control and treatment of dyslipidemia.

    Digital sclerosis- This is more common in type 1 diabetes. It is characterized by the development of thick, tight, and waxy skin on the back of the hands, making the person’s joints stiffer.

    Those with diabetes are at increased risk of skin diseases. They should take extra care to keep the skin moisturized and clean, to avoid hot baths, use mild shampoos and soaps, and take special care of specific areas like armpits and groins.  Those with diabetes should develop a habit of regular skin inspection, as many conditions may develop without any symptoms and thus may go unnoticed.

     

     

     

    Diabetes is a progressive and chronic condition that affects every part of the body, and skin is no exception. In diabetes, skin conditions occur due to metabolic disturbances that cause changes in microcirculation, skin innervation, and immune responses. Some of the skin conditions in diabetes are unspecific, like a fungal infection, while others are more characteristic of the condition, like diabetic dermopathy or eruptive xanthomatosis.

    General skin conditions

    Bacterial infections – Bacterial infections are common in diabetes, since those with the disease have damaged skin innervation, damaged immunity, and live with chronic inflammation, thus such a person more prone to skin infections. Even a minute cut may turn into a chronic non-healing ulcer. Those with diabetes may develop boils, folliculitis, carbuncles, and infections of nails. Staphylococcal infection is the most common reason behind such eruptions.

    Fungal infections - People with diabetes may develop itchy skin due to a yeast-like fungus called Candida albicans. This fungal disease most commonly occurs in the moist parts of skin areas like under the breasts, in the mouth, between the fingers, and in armpits and groins. Athlete's foot is also common among those living with diabetes.

    Diabetes-specific skin conditions

    Diabetic dermopathy- a common condition in prolonged diabetes occurs due to damage caused to small blood vessels of the skin. A person living with diabetes may develop brown scaly patches in the front of the legs. These patches are painless and in fact completely symptomless, thus they rarely require any specific treatment. Instead, better control of diabetes helps in controlling them.

    Acanthosis Nigricans - This is a condition characterized by the development of dark-colored patches that are slightly raised. These patches usually occur on the hands, knees, and elbows. They are more common among the overweight individuals, and often weight reduction is the best treatment.

    Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD) - This condition looks similar to diabetic dermopathy, but is more severe and is characterized by fewer, but more profound and larger spots. NLD is caused due to vascular changes in diabetes. Unlike diabetic dermopathy, NLD patches may become scaly, and in rare cases, they may even crack. They do not require treatment unless they break or get infected.

    Diabetic blisters (Bullosis diabeticorum)- These are a formation of burn like blisters, that are painless and would heal in about 2-3 weeks. These blisters occur primarily due to neuropathy. Fortunately, such blisters will not leave a scar, and the only care that is required is to keep the skin clean so that they do not get infected at any stage. Bringing blood sugar level under control is the primary treatment of it.

    Eruptive xanthomatosis - They are mostly an indicator of poorly controlled diabetes and thus are more common in those with type 1 diabetes with severe dyslipidemia (high blood cholesterol and triglycerides). It’s a condition characterized by the formation of yellow, pea-like enlargements at the back of hands, feet, buttocks. Only effective treatment of this condition is diabetes control and treatment of dyslipidemia.

    Digital sclerosis- This is more common in type 1 diabetes. It is characterized by the development of thick, tight, and waxy skin on the back of the hands, making the person’s joints stiffer.

    Those with diabetes are at increased risk of skin diseases. They should take extra care to keep the skin moisturized and clean, to avoid hot baths, use mild shampoos and soaps, and take special care of specific areas like armpits and groins.  Those with diabetes should develop a habit of regular skin inspection, as many conditions may develop without any symptoms and thus may go unnoticed.

     

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  • Diabetes & Hydration Diabetes & Hydration

    Posted on by Anabelle Savion

     

    Polyuria (increased urine output) and polydipsia (increased thirst) are classic symptoms of diabetes. They often indicate how well diabetes is controlled. Polyuria and polydipsia along with severe dehydration, are often the initial symptoms of diabetes. The question arises as to why the body starts to lose more fluids in diabetes, and what are its implications?

    In diabetes, as the blood glucose rises above the standard acceptable levels, our body tries hard to bring it back to the normal. One of the mechanisms involved in reducing blood sugars is through increased elimination via the kidneys. However, as the kidneys work harder to get rid of extra glucose in the blood, they also eliminate more fluids in the process.

    Another reason for dehydration in diabetes is higher osmotic pressure in blood vessels triggered by the increased glucose concentration, resulting in dehydration of body cells. If blood glucose is too high in the blood, it literarily sucks the water from the body cells.

    Dehydration in diabetes is a vicious circle. As the body loses fluids due to dehydration, the glucose concentration is further increased, resulting in even further dehydration of the body cells. Moreover, the increase of glucose concentration in the blood stimulates more urea production, and increases the dehydration, which also increases insulin resistance. Obviously there is a need to break this vicious cycle.

     

    What are the symptoms of dehydration?

    As the water content in the body goes down, skin becomes dry, as do the mouth and eyes. The person may feel increased thirst, headaches, tiredness or dizziness. In severe cases, a fall in blood pressure can cause sunken eyes, weak pulse, confusion, and lethargy.

    Preventing dehydration in diabetes

    Those living with diabetes are at increased risk of dehydration. This may also negatively impact the blood glucose control particularly during summers, when even mild physical exertion may cause dehydration. Therefore, people with diabetes should drink more fluids and more often. There is no hard and fast rule regarding how much fluid to consume, as that would depend on environmental temperature, the intensity of physical activity, and severity of the disease. Nonetheless, a diabetic person should make a habit of drinking fluids in small portions every half an hour.

    While special drinks are reserved for more severe conditions, it is essential to consume more water or other fluids such as sugarless green tea, which can be consumed either hot or cold, depending on personal preference and weather conditions.

    One way to keep hydrated is to make drinking a routine. Drinking a cup of green tea five times a day at a fixed time, would help to stay hydrated and prevent any complications.

    A diabetic can drink sports or energy drinks in moderation as long as the diabetes is not severe, but they are best avoided, as these special drinks are high in added sugars.

    Although alcohol in moderation is not contraindicated in diabetes, it could have other undesired effects on the electrolyte balance and hemodynamics. Alcohol is better avoided by those who have blood pressure problems, and those who have difficulty in staying hydrated.

     

    Polyuria (increased urine output) and polydipsia (increased thirst) are classic symptoms of diabetes. They often indicate how well diabetes is controlled. Polyuria and polydipsia along with severe dehydration, are often the initial symptoms of diabetes. The question arises as to why the body starts to lose more fluids in diabetes, and what are its implications?

    In diabetes, as the blood glucose rises above the standard acceptable levels, our body tries hard to bring it back to the normal. One of the mechanisms involved in reducing blood sugars is through increased elimination via the kidneys. However, as the kidneys work harder to get rid of extra glucose in the blood, they also eliminate more fluids in the process.

    Another reason for dehydration in diabetes is higher osmotic pressure in blood vessels triggered by the increased glucose concentration, resulting in dehydration of body cells. If blood glucose is too high in the blood, it literarily sucks the water from the body cells.

    Dehydration in diabetes is a vicious circle. As the body loses fluids due to dehydration, the glucose concentration is further increased, resulting in even further dehydration of the body cells. Moreover, the increase of glucose concentration in the blood stimulates more urea production, and increases the dehydration, which also increases insulin resistance. Obviously there is a need to break this vicious cycle.

     

    What are the symptoms of dehydration?

    As the water content in the body goes down, skin becomes dry, as do the mouth and eyes. The person may feel increased thirst, headaches, tiredness or dizziness. In severe cases, a fall in blood pressure can cause sunken eyes, weak pulse, confusion, and lethargy.

    Preventing dehydration in diabetes

    Those living with diabetes are at increased risk of dehydration. This may also negatively impact the blood glucose control particularly during summers, when even mild physical exertion may cause dehydration. Therefore, people with diabetes should drink more fluids and more often. There is no hard and fast rule regarding how much fluid to consume, as that would depend on environmental temperature, the intensity of physical activity, and severity of the disease. Nonetheless, a diabetic person should make a habit of drinking fluids in small portions every half an hour.

    While special drinks are reserved for more severe conditions, it is essential to consume more water or other fluids such as sugarless green tea, which can be consumed either hot or cold, depending on personal preference and weather conditions.

    One way to keep hydrated is to make drinking a routine. Drinking a cup of green tea five times a day at a fixed time, would help to stay hydrated and prevent any complications.

    A diabetic can drink sports or energy drinks in moderation as long as the diabetes is not severe, but they are best avoided, as these special drinks are high in added sugars.

    Although alcohol in moderation is not contraindicated in diabetes, it could have other undesired effects on the electrolyte balance and hemodynamics. Alcohol is better avoided by those who have blood pressure problems, and those who have difficulty in staying hydrated.

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  • 12 Common Summertime Skin Rashes in Children 12 Common Summertime Skin Rashes in Children

    Posted on by Anabelle Savion

    Summertime is fun-time, play time, splash time, a time when children are more active, spend more time outside, they interact more with the natural environment, they enjoy and strengthen their bodies. Unfortunately, this increased interaction with the environment also puts them at higher risk of specific skin conditions. Here are the top 12 summertime skin problems in young children.

     

    1. Heat rashes- due to the heat of summer and friction between the skin folds, certain parts of the body may develop red bumps or even blisters. Neck folds, elbows, armpits, are more prone to such rashes. Prevent them by dressing your child in comfortable and sweat absorbing clothing. Sometimes talcum powder may help.

    2. Plant rashes- Some plants may irritate the skin or cause allergic reactions, but children are often not aware of such dangers. If any such plants grow in the neighborhood, it is better to teach children about them. In case a child is exposed to such plant, treat the skin with hydrocortisone cream.

    3. Eczema- is an allergic reaction that may be triggered by food items, by dry air, overheating, sweating, or it may even be triggered by chlorine in a pool. If you know the reason for eczema, then just avoid the exposure. Anti-allergic ointments are available from the pharmacy.

    4. Insect bites- These may cause anything from mild discomfort and itchiness to severe anaphylactic shock in allergic children. It is best to teach a child regarding such dangers. If a child is known to have an anaphylactic reaction to an insect bite, then keeping an EpiPen at home makes sense, it may be injected before the arrival of emergency services.

    5. Impetigo- This is a common childhood bacterial infection that may cause rashes or blisters. It may require treatment with an antibiotic. Consult your pediatrician.

    6. Swimmer’s itch- This often occurs while swimming in lakes and other natural water reserves. It is caused by to a parasite that burrows into the skin. Avoid swimming at places that are known to harbor these parasites. In case of exposure, tell the child not to scratch. In most cases it will get well without treatment, but in some extreme instances it may require medical care.

    7. Sandworms- As the name connotes, these are worms that are found in sand and they may burrow into the child’s skin while playing with sand. If often happens at places where sand has been contaminated by feces of animals. Usually, it heals by itself in a month, but some cases may need treatment.

    8. Folliculitis- Also called hot tub rash, it occurs when taking a bath in untidy pools and tubs. This condition is an infection of hair follicle, and it may sometimes need treatment with antibiotics.

    9. Molluscum virus- Yet another infection caught through contaminated water pools. It is a viral infection that causes dome-shaped bumps; rashes would generally occur on the chest, back, arms or legs. It is contagious infection thus a child must not share bedding or towel with others while infected. Fortunately, the disease is self-limiting, and a child would get well without any treatment.

    10. Sweaty socks syndrome- caused due to extensive sweating of feet, often the result of wearing improper footwear. Thus the solution to the condition is to wear breathable footwear. If the skin of toes crack, consult your pediatrician.

    11. Ringworm- is a fungal infection that can occur at any age. It happens more commonly in moist parts of the body. The rash is oval and usually very itchy. The rash is typically red at the edges, while not very red in the center. It is treated with antifungal ointments.

    12. Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease- is caused by Enterovirus coxsackie, and as the name says, painful rashes are present around the mouth, inside the mouth, and at hands and feet (palm and soles). A child may develop a fever. Infection is self-limiting and should disappear within a week.

     

    NOTE:

    LAVIOR was founded with the single-minded purpose of finding natural plant-based solutions to as many of today’s afflictions as possible. Though our goal is still to be fully realized, we did make great strides in that direction.

    Our product line is based on a powerful medicinal plant that has been proven to be:
    Anti-Inflammatory
    - Anti-Viral
    - Anti-Bacterial
    - Anti-Fungal
    - Anti-Oxidant

     

    Summertime is fun-time, play time, splash time, a time when children are more active, spend more time outside, they interact more with the natural environment, they enjoy and strengthen their bodies. Unfortunately, this increased interaction with the environment also puts them at higher risk of specific skin conditions. Here are the top 12 summertime skin problems in young children.

     

    1. Heat rashes- due to the heat of summer and friction between the skin folds, certain parts of the body may develop red bumps or even blisters. Neck folds, elbows, armpits, are more prone to such rashes. Prevent them by dressing your child in comfortable and sweat absorbing clothing. Sometimes talcum powder may help.

    2. Plant rashes- Some plants may irritate the skin or cause allergic reactions, but children are often not aware of such dangers. If any such plants grow in the neighborhood, it is better to teach children about them. In case a child is exposed to such plant, treat the skin with hydrocortisone cream.

    3. Eczema- is an allergic reaction that may be triggered by food items, by dry air, overheating, sweating, or it may even be triggered by chlorine in a pool. If you know the reason for eczema, then just avoid the exposure. Anti-allergic ointments are available from the pharmacy.

    4. Insect bites- These may cause anything from mild discomfort and itchiness to severe anaphylactic shock in allergic children. It is best to teach a child regarding such dangers. If a child is known to have an anaphylactic reaction to an insect bite, then keeping an EpiPen at home makes sense, it may be injected before the arrival of emergency services.

    5. Impetigo- This is a common childhood bacterial infection that may cause rashes or blisters. It may require treatment with an antibiotic. Consult your pediatrician.

    6. Swimmer’s itch- This often occurs while swimming in lakes and other natural water reserves. It is caused by to a parasite that burrows into the skin. Avoid swimming at places that are known to harbor these parasites. In case of exposure, tell the child not to scratch. In most cases it will get well without treatment, but in some extreme instances it may require medical care.

    7. Sandworms- As the name connotes, these are worms that are found in sand and they may burrow into the child’s skin while playing with sand. If often happens at places where sand has been contaminated by feces of animals. Usually, it heals by itself in a month, but some cases may need treatment.

    8. Folliculitis- Also called hot tub rash, it occurs when taking a bath in untidy pools and tubs. This condition is an infection of hair follicle, and it may sometimes need treatment with antibiotics.

    9. Molluscum virus- Yet another infection caught through contaminated water pools. It is a viral infection that causes dome-shaped bumps; rashes would generally occur on the chest, back, arms or legs. It is contagious infection thus a child must not share bedding or towel with others while infected. Fortunately, the disease is self-limiting, and a child would get well without any treatment.

    10. Sweaty socks syndrome- caused due to extensive sweating of feet, often the result of wearing improper footwear. Thus the solution to the condition is to wear breathable footwear. If the skin of toes crack, consult your pediatrician.

    11. Ringworm- is a fungal infection that can occur at any age. It happens more commonly in moist parts of the body. The rash is oval and usually very itchy. The rash is typically red at the edges, while not very red in the center. It is treated with antifungal ointments.

    12. Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease- is caused by Enterovirus coxsackie, and as the name says, painful rashes are present around the mouth, inside the mouth, and at hands and feet (palm and soles). A child may develop a fever. Infection is self-limiting and should disappear within a week.

     

    NOTE:

    LAVIOR was founded with the single-minded purpose of finding natural plant-based solutions to as many of today’s afflictions as possible. Though our goal is still to be fully realized, we did make great strides in that direction.

    Our product line is based on a powerful medicinal plant that has been proven to be:
    Anti-Inflammatory
    - Anti-Viral
    - Anti-Bacterial
    - Anti-Fungal
    - Anti-Oxidant

     

    Read more